Eschhörnchen

coffee seminar and fillet of pork in coffee-salt crust with rosemary potatoes and roasted radicchio and balsamico jus

fillet of pork in coffee-salt crust with rosemary potatoes and roasted radicchio and balsamico jus

At the beginning of May I was invited to a coffee workshop at Gliss Coffee Contor (a shop in Cologne for coffee lovers) with Claudia and Michael. Michael is Germany’s first coffee sommelier.

I first met both on a book party last autumn. The shop is located in Cologne on St. Aspern St. and has existed for 14 years. Their coffee beans are bought directly from the farmers, so they are fair trade, an affair which is very important to them. They do not roast the beans themselves, but at a roaster in northern Nordrhein Westfalen, which has done this for three generations. But don’t be afraid; the beans, which you can buy in their shop, are always fresh and have the best quality you can buy.

I was very happy about the invitation also, because my espresso beans at home need a refill. The only thing I was worried about was consuming coffee so late. And yes, I fell asleep at one o’clock; not really dramatic, but my alarm starts at 5 a.m. and that’s not a very long time. :-)

fillet of pork in coffee-salt crust with rosemary potatoes and roasted radicchio and balsamico jus

To start the workshop we got one or two glasses of cava (yes, it was only me who got two glasses :-) but hey…)

The other participants were Diana from, “essen auf den Tisch,” (German blog) and a father with his son. Yeah, a funny group.

Michael started to tell us something about the coffee history, and his way was so sympathetic, full of enthusiasm. You directly feel his heartfelt concern about coffee. It’s difficult to tell you how it was. I would suggest that you attend one of his courses, then you’ll know what I mean.

After all the history stuff, we went for the coffee tasting.

fillet of pork in coffee-salt crust with rosemary potatoes and roasted radicchio and balsamico jus

The first coffee comes from Sumatra, and, guys, it was nothing for me. To me it tasted like old coffee which stood too long in the machine.

The second coffee was from Kenya. It was definitely softer, and I could imagine drinking it with some milk.
Yeah, I need milk in my coffee. Not in my espresso, please, and no sugar anyway, but coffee without milk, I don’t like. Except the third coffee.

This was from Ethiopia. It was softer than the second, like velvet. This coffee would be lost with a splash of milk.

At the end of the workshop, we tried one espresso. I adore espresso, the blacker, the better.

And now, if you think this workshop was all fun, nope. To taste all the different flavors of a coffee, you should drink it at 20 degrees C, and all of us know how (disgusting) lukewarm coffee tastes. Yes, you’re right, like that…

So, if you want to know more about coffee, go to your local roasting facility or coffee shop and pester them with questions. They are the right contact to get more information. Or, come to Cologne, go directly to Gliss Coffee, and ask them. :-)

And because this is a food blog, I also have a recipe with coffee for you: fillet of pork in coffee-salt crust with rosemary potatoes and roasted radicchio and balsamico jus.

fillet of pork in coffee-salt crust with rosemary potatoes and roasted radicchio and balsamico jus

 

fillet of pork in coffee-salt crust with rosemary potatoes and roasted radicchio and balsamico jus (2 persons)
rosmary potatoes:
Cook unpeeled potatoes in salted water.Once the pork is in the oven, fry the potatoes in olive oil and season with salt, pepper and rosemary.
fillet of pork:
Preheat the oven to 180 ° C Season the meat with pepper and fry in a oil on all sides.Mix coffee with salt, rosemary and egg whites. On the bottom of a baking dish place about 1/3 of the salt, put the pork in it and cover with remaining salt and cook for 20 minutes.
balsamic jus:
Boil balsamic with port wine in a saucepan and let reduce.
roasted radicchio:
Remove the outer leaves of radicchio, then cut into quarters (or eighths). Heat oil in a pan, sauté radicchio in it. Season with honey, salt and pepper. Deglaze with balsamic.

And after this one espresso doppio, or? And maybe a piece of this mocka - tarte?

Try it out.

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